Getting to know the teacher behind North Cache’s classroom full of life — Teacher of the Year, Marla Trowbridge

NC science teacher Marla Trowbridge holding a snake

 

Growing up, Marla Trowbridge didn’t plan to become a teacher. Her love for animals and science propelled her towards her dream of becoming a veterinarian. However, eventually, she found a new passion, teaching in the classroom. 

 

Trowbridge spends her time now sharing her love for animals and science with students at North Cache Middle School. With 11 animals in her classroom, counting Miss Tilly the Bulldog, students get many hands-on opportunities in a learning environment that’s full of life. Trowbridge’s fun personality, dedication to her students, and closet full of 140+ science shirts are all part of what makes her who she is. She has been selected as North Cache Middle School’s 2019-2020 Teacher of the Year. 

 

Marla Trowbridge and a student holding a snake

 

Principal John Anderson praised Trowbridge for her ability to engage students in lessons through her creative teaching and hands-on approach. He described some of the many things that she contributes to their school community, including maintaining her live exhibits, holding students accountable, and purchasing new microscopes to share with the science teachers. She works through the summer painting classrooms, found Miss Tilly, and much more. 

 

“She shows an authentic caring for all students. She takes time to get to know her students and shows an interest in them,” Anderson said. “Marla is often at school every night helping new teachers develop lesson plans for the next day. She is a very dedicated teacher who gives her all to improve our school environment.”

 

Trowbridge shared that her favorite thing to teach students is “anything that has to do with life sciences,” but she hopes that students leave her classroom having learned a more important lesson.  

 

“I want the kids to walk out of my classroom with a love of science and a respect for life in all of its varieties,” Trowbridge said. “In five years, they’re not going to remember all of the nitty-gritty of what they were taught in this classroom. But they will remember how they were treated, the animals and labs, and most importantly they’ll walk out of here able to converse in science and willing to ask questions.”

 

Marla Trowbridge and a lizard